GISinc Blog

GISinc Blog

Dreaming on a Cloud

Published August 26, 2009 by GISi George

What I bring to the GISi team is a whole lot of scar tissue; the kind diagnóstico you only get from pushing technology beyond its design limits. The first wave of GIS began in wholesale MLB jerseys the 1960’s driven by men like Roger Tomlinson, Howard Fisher and Jack Dangermond. They were the visionaries who understood computer technology could revolutionize the use of spatial data. These pioneers laid virtual graph paper across the world and transformed it into x.y coordinates. They conceived the data structures we take for granted: a road is a series of coordinates with wholesale NFL jerseys intersections where it meets other roads.

In the l’intérieur 1970’s the nascent industry focused cheap NFL jerseys on villa building a technology toolkit GIS to enter, maintain, display and analyze spatial data. This second wave was driven by government initiatives often implemented by technology entrepreneurs. The reliance on government funding was driven by the cost of hardware with wholesale Arizona Cardinals jerseys mainframe computers selling for hundreds of thousands and minicomputers priced in the tens of thousands. Most GIS software was command line driven requiring a fairly sophisticated user base.

In the 1980’s the first wholesale Minnesota Vikings jerseys commercial and Queen widely used government GIS packages reached the market, beginning with Arc/Info®, GRASS, SPANS,  MapInfo®, Smallworld, MGE, and ERMapper. I was hired by ESRI in 1986 and eagerly joined this 3rd wave of GIS. Our mantra was “there’s definitely a practical application for this cool stuff” and we were determined to find it. We spent half our time evangelizing, convincing people that GIS really could solve their problems. We spent the other half reengineering the software tools to produce the benefits we had promised.

So you’ll have to excuse me Euthanasia if my posts sound like I’m dreaming on a cloud. It’s what I was trained to do; to look beyond today’s technology and what is currently “practical”. And I’ve spent my career transforming dreams to proven reality.

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